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themyskira:

[While filming the cathedral scene,] I was introduced to a minister and said, “You know he’s about renounce God, right?” The minister said, “Yeah, I saw rehearsal, it’s gonna be great.” I said, “That’s fine, but am I going straight to hell?” He said, “Maybe for other stuff, but not for this.” Then he gave me a pretty good talking-to about how true people of faith are supposed to question God. …
Bartlet’s the son of a man who, we learn, is an intellectual Fredo. The father, obviously convinced that he married some Catholic b*tch, treats his son terribly for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that the son has adopted and clearly loves his mother’s religion. The speech in the cathedral directed as much to his father as it was to God. Thus the cigarette. 
Bartlet has a degenerative disease. He’s lied about it and has to reveal it to the country. His presidency is in jeopardy. He has a job that’s virtually impossible to do well, one in which he’s responsible for people dying all the time. 57 people are trapped inside an embassy. Mrs. Landingham was senselessly killed. As she said, he’s having a bit of a day. 
He made his peace with God. Mrs. Landingham’s appearance in the penultimate scene wasn’t a ghost. He was talking to himself, using her memory to coax himself in the right direction. Tommy was sure to show you the wide shot of Bartlet talking with nobody else in the room. And when the scene was done, he looked out at the storm that he was sure God had sent just to mess with him, and realised it was God sending him His strength. And he baptised himself in it. And as he passed by the church in the motorcade, a custodian, a child of God, picked the cigarette butt off the ground, and we cut back to Bartlet, who sensed something move inside of him.
It’s never my intention offend anybody or be reckless with things that are important to others. I meant the episode as a tribute to faith.
— Aaron Sorkin

themyskira:

[While filming the cathedral scene,] I was introduced to a minister and said, “You know he’s about renounce God, right?” The minister said, “Yeah, I saw rehearsal, it’s gonna be great.” I said, “That’s fine, but am I going straight to hell?” He said, “Maybe for other stuff, but not for this.” Then he gave me a pretty good talking-to about how true people of faith are supposed to question God. …

Bartlet’s the son of a man who, we learn, is an intellectual Fredo. The father, obviously convinced that he married some Catholic b*tch, treats his son terribly for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that the son has adopted and clearly loves his mother’s religion. The speech in the cathedral directed as much to his father as it was to God. Thus the cigarette. 

Bartlet has a degenerative disease. He’s lied about it and has to reveal it to the country. His presidency is in jeopardy. He has a job that’s virtually impossible to do well, one in which he’s responsible for people dying all the time. 57 people are trapped inside an embassy. Mrs. Landingham was senselessly killed. As she said, he’s having a bit of a day. 

He made his peace with God. Mrs. Landingham’s appearance in the penultimate scene wasn’t a ghost. He was talking to himself, using her memory to coax himself in the right direction. Tommy was sure to show you the wide shot of Bartlet talking with nobody else in the room. And when the scene was done, he looked out at the storm that he was sure God had sent just to mess with him, and realised it was God sending him His strength. And he baptised himself in it. And as he passed by the church in the motorcade, a custodian, a child of God, picked the cigarette butt off the ground, and we cut back to Bartlet, who sensed something move inside of him.

It’s never my intention offend anybody or be reckless with things that are important to others. I meant the episode as a tribute to faith.

— Aaron Sorkin

(via itsabook)

*75

"We shot the service at the National Cathedral, and during rehearsals there were a number of clergy standing around watching. I walked up to a priest who was standing nearby and said, “Excuse me, Father? I think you should know that in the scene we’re about to do Martin Sheen is going to curse at God.” He smiled and said, “I know, it’s gonna be great.”"

Aaron Sorkin discussing “Two Cathedrals”, one of the best episodes of television ever created, in this brilliant Hollywood Reporter piece on looking back at The West Wing 15 years later. (via studiosixty)

(via itsabook)

andreagalad:

Lucifer - Andrea Galad

andreagalad:

Lucifer - Andrea Galad

(via quillery)


Jed Bartlet: Yes, I lied. It was a sin. I’ve committed many sins. Have I displeased you, you feckless thug?

Jed Bartlet: Yes, I lied. It was a sin. I’ve committed many sins. Have I displeased you, you feckless thug?

(Source: snarkywordsworth, via itsabook)

"A FEMALE Assassin? How does she kill? With a BOOB!?"

someone at Ubisoft, probably (via guy)

(Source: aatrox, via randomthoughtsfromscarypeople)

lynnerdo:

IM FUCKING DYYING

(Source: dinosquad, via spookyworldofspooky)

*4

itsabook:

You all need to watch the first two seasons of the West Wing just so you can experience the brilliance that is the season two finale.

Letters give life to Aboriginal Kaurna language | The Australian

FOR the first time since the 1860s, the Kaurna language of the Adelaide plains is being spoken fluently by three young Aboriginal men.

The result is the culmination of more than 20 years of painstaking research into the dormant ­language, which has allowed a new generation of Aboriginal men to revive the tongue of their ancestors.

Jack Buckskin is one of the three men in Adelaide now fluent in Kaurna, which had been considered a “dead language” since its last known speaker, Ivarityi, died in 1929.

Mr Buckskin has worked with linguists from the University of Adelaide on the Kaurna Warra Pintyanthi project to learn the language and to develop teaching resources.

“It was only since the late 1980s and early 90s that our elders started to learn language and now it has started to filter down through the future generations,” Mr Buckskin said.

“We knew words as we were growing up as kids, but we didn’t know how it all flowed together without any English, and we didn’t know which language we were speaking.”

He began to learn the Kaurna language as a young adult.

Mr Buckskin is now teaching his young children Maleaha and Vincent to speak the language. They will be the first people to claim Kaurna as their mother tongue in more than 150 years.

The language revival began in 1989 as part of an event tied to the Adelaide Festival that translated songs into local indigenous languages.

Linguist Rob Amery from the University of Adelaide then began to collect source material in order to document the language as interest in its revival grew.

The most important source was an illustrated manuscript of about 3000 words made by two German missionaries, Christian Gottlob Teichelmann and Clamor Wilhelm Schurmann, who came to Adelaide in the 1830s and 1840s.

Other documents included translations of six German hymns and the Ten Commandments, some of which had been preserved in South Africa.

These were used to reconstruct the lost grammar of ­Kaurna.

Just five documents written by Kaurna people in their own language in the 19th century have survived to help with the task, including letters written by Kaurna schoolchildren in 1843 to the Leipzig Mission in Germany.

“It is quite remarkable when we look back,” Dr Amery says.

“The language has far exceeded my expectations. I never thought it would come as far as it has. It is much more than a linguistic exercise; it is about language and culture and land and identity.”

(Source: linguisten, via black-australia)

"i am
my name
my religion
my country
my heritage
my ethnicity
my nationality
so how dare you
use your lazy english
and mispronounce my name"

lazy english by gurkeyrith  | insta: @ gurrkeyrith (via gurkeyrith)

(via black-australia)